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Canadian Caregiver Program Overhauled

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (“CIC”) recently announced major changes to the (former) Live-in Caregiver program. The former program has now been split into 2 distinct streams:
  1. Caring for Children Class
  2. Caring For People With High Medical Needs Class

These 2 new economic immigration classes will allow those who have Canadian work experience in caring for children or for individuals with high medical needs to apply for permanent residence.

Caring for Children Class

The biggest changed this program is the removal of the “live-in” requirement for caregivers. The program allows anyone who worked full-time in the care of children to apply for permanent residence.

The program requirements are as follows:

  • Work experience:
    • within the 4 years before the date of the application, have at least 2 years of full-time work experience in Canada as a home child care provider
    • That the job duties meet the specifications outlined in unit group 4411 of the National Occupation Classification (NOC)
  • Language proficiency:
    • achieve a minimum score of Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 5 in either official language. This minimum score is required for each of the four skill areas (reading, writing, listening, speaking)
    • Complete official language test (IELTS or CELPIP for English)
  • Educational credentials:
    • a Canadian educational credential of at least one year of post-secondary studies; or
    • foreign diploma, certificate or credential, along with an equivalency assessment (issued within the last 5 years), which indicates that the foreign diploma, certificate or credential is equivalent to a Canadian educational credential of at least one year of post-secondary studies

Caring For People With High Medical Needs Class:

Previously, those who cared for individuals with high medical needs also applied under the live-in caregiver program. This new Class expands on the types of individuals who can now apply for permanent residence in Canada.

The requirements of this program are:

  • Work experience:
    • in the 4 years preceding the date of the application, have at least 2 years of full-time work experience in one of the following occupations:
      • as a registered nurse or registered psychiatric nurse – NOC 3012
      • a licensed practical nurse – NOC 3233
      • a nurse’s aide, orderly or patient service associate – NOC 3413
      • a home support worker or related occupation, but not a housekeeper – NOC 4412 
    • any licensing requirements of the above occupations must be met
  • Language proficiency:
    • if applying as a registered nurse or registered psychiatrists (NOC 3012), a minimum of CLB 7 is required; and
    • if applying in one of the other 3 listed occupations (NOC 3233, 3413, or 4412), a minimum of CLB 5 is required
  • Educational credentials:
    • a Canadian educational credential of at least one year of post-secondary studies; or
    • foreign diploma, certificate or credential, along with an equivalency assessment (issued within the last 5 years), which indicates that the foreign diploma, certificate or credential is equivalent to a Canadian educational credential of at least one year of post-secondary studies

Although applications under the old live-in caregiver class are still being accepted, they must be accompanied by proof that the original live-in caregiver work permit was issued pursuant to a Labour market impact assessment (LMIA), prior to November 29, 2014. Those were able to demonstrate this may still apply under the old program, which would be processed according to the old criteria.

Comments

  1. Hi please is it the same minimum celpip score required for the old live in caregiver

    ReplyDelete
  2. Article très informatif, que vous avez partagé ici sur le système de citoyenneté et d'immigration du Canada. Je suis impressionné par les détails que vous avez partagés dans ce post et cela révèle à quel point vous comprenez bien ce sujet. Merci de partager cet article ici. avocat Immigration Canada Maroc

    ReplyDelete

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